A Partial Government Shutdown Hangs in the Balance due to Continued Boarder Wall Debates

While political debates about the boarder wall between the US and Mexico have been going on for quite some time, Trump is now threatening a partial government shutdown if congress fails to advance spending for the wall by December 21. This would affect many transportation programs.

The threat of a partial government shutdown that would ensnare transportation programs looms as congressional Republicans and Democrats continue to disagree about President Donald Trump’s funding request for a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.

If lawmakers fail to advance a fiscal 2019 appropriations measure or a short-term spending fix by Dec. 21, funding for programs at the U.S. Department of Transportation — as well as other departments and agencies that oversee commerce, the environment and financial services — would be disrupted.

For instance, about 30% of DOT’s workforce would be furloughed, and 53,000 Transportation Security Administration staff would have to work without pay, Democrats on the Senate Appropriations Committee noted.

“By manufacturing a crisis over his wall, President Trump appears willing to shutter the doors of the … Department of Transportation, among others,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, the top Democrat on the Appropriations Committee. “He wants hard-working American taxpayers, not Mexico, to write him a check for $5 billion more, or he will shut the government down? Come on.”

If Congress does agree to advance House and Senate versions of the fiscal 2019 transportation funding bill, policy that would deny funding for certain requirements for electronic logging devices pertaining to livestock haulers would be approved.

This year, the livestock haulers industry raised concerns about ELD rules to members of Congress. The ELD mandate went into effect in December 2017. It requires commercial carriers to equip their trucks with ELDs to record hours of service.

Separately, senior Senate aides tell Transport Topics that autonomous vehicles policy legislation that does not include trucking-centric provisions is unlikely to advance in the lame-duck session.

Republican leaders insist their aim is to avoid a shutdown while acknowledging little progress since the recent enactment of a short-term funding measure keeping federal agencies operating through Dec. 21.

“We don’t know how long the discussion over the government funding issue is going to go on,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters Dec. 11. His leadership team is pressing their Democratic counterparts over Trump’s $5 billion request for a border wall that the president had said Mexico would fund.

McConnell’s remarks came soon after Trump hosted congressional Democratic leaders at the White House. During the combative meeting with media present, the president expressed a commitment to fund the border wall even if it meant temporarily halting federal programs.

“I will be the one to shut it down. I’m not going to blame you for it,” Trump said, speaking to Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) “I’m going to shut it down for border security.”

Schumer said his caucus did not want to shut down the government. Most Democrats on Capitol Hill would support considerably less funding than Trump’s request for border security programs.

After the meeting with the president, incoming House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) criticized the sentiment about a shutdown. As she put it, “The ‘Trump Shutdown’ is something that can be avoided, that the American people do not need, at this time of economic uncertainty, people losing jobs, the market in a mood and the rest.”

When the new Congress convenes in January, Democrats will manage the House and Republicans will keep control of the Senate.

McConnell will continue to serve as Senate leader. Pelosi is expected to be elected speaker for the second time during her service in Congress after she agreed to limit herself to two terms. This action was meant to calm concerns from newly elected members of the Democratic caucus who are seeking to change the status quo in Washington.

Read the article on Transport Topics by clicking here.

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New App to Help Drivers’ Sleep Habits

Personalized apps seem to be popping up all over. According to a recent article published by FreightWaves, a new app called dayzz is designed to ensure that drivers are getting enough sleep to carry out their duties more safely and efficiently. The app is still in beta testing.

Chad Prevost of FreightWaves writes:

On average, according to recent estimates, truckers get 4.78 hours of sleep per day. The lack of sleep frequently results in drowsiness, which leads to all manner of safety-related issues, but also speaks to general quality of life issues for drivers. In the U.S., over 110,000 people are injured and more than 5,000 are killed per year in motor vehicle accidents involving commercial trucks. Working as a truck driver is an immensely demanding job, and it is the responsibility of both the drivers and carriers to ensure they are getting enough sleep to fulfill their duties safely and efficiently. It happens that a lot of drivers have sleep disorders, and they also happen to be driving huge machines.

An upcoming player in the health and tech market is startup dayzz, a subsidiary of Maarbarot Products, an Israeli developer, manufacturer, and marketer of advanced nutrition and health products. Since July 2017, dayzz has been developing an evidence-based, personalized sleep training app for enterprise workforces to improve sleep quality while reducing healthcare and employer costs.

FreightWaves spoke with CEO Amir Inditzky and chief science officer, Dr. Mairav Cohen-Zion, about how dayzz works. “Effectively treating sleep conditions necessitates a thorough understanding and attention to individual elements. dayzz achieves just that by offering a one stop source of known high-quality, effective sleep solutions integrated into an individualized tailored sleep management program,” says Cohen-Zion.

The developing tech is created to diagnose and treat better ways to sleep. “What is already happening in this market is that dayzz is seeking to give an end-to-end solution. From training through helping the user to keep track of the training. We’re gaining data from all kinds of data points and we’re able to create smart data points to work with the user. This kind of dialog and training plan helps us to solve this problem better than ever before,” says Inditzky.

“The app synchronizes with your Garmin or your other devices to optimize the treatment,” he adds.

Sometimes app information might reveal a sleep apnea condition. For most patients, sleep apnea is for life and when you’re diagnosed with it, it is highly recommended that you’re proactive in your prescribed treatment therapy. This is a critical time to begin CPAP therapy, but for many the information is overwhelming.

“So what happens—not only in the trucking industry but everywhere—the conversion rate of people working with sleep apnea treatment plans often don’t follow through because it’s uncomfortable and difficult,” says Cohen-Zion. “The CPAP device itself is uncomfortable or scary for many reasons—both physically and psychologically—people want to avoid it. You’re also often on your own adjusting to it.”

“This is tailored and customized therapy so that people can address each individual problem. Studies have shown when you give that personal attention people don’t feel so alone and success rates rise exponentially,” says Cohen-Zion. “The beauty of the app is that you can take it home with you. It tracks you. Keeps up with all your stats. It’s there to envelop you and support every aspect of your life.”

Currently, the app is aimed at every data point, and it doesn’t necessarily mean it has to work with a CPAP device.

“There’s all kinds of sleep disorders,” says Cohen-Zion. “The treatment may not be for a CPAP device. Most often it’s about behaviors.”

“With drivers it’s very complex to treat. In order to help them we are creating this data protocol to deal with sleepwalking, and also disorders that can be related to jet lag and changing time zones. We are aiming at the trucking industry with a specific vertical for them,” says Inditzky.

“Besides the CPAP, we work on creating a better environment, a day-to-day routine. Cognitive therapy is a part of this process,” adds Cohen-Zion.

According to the dayzz team, sleep apnea actually tends to be diagnosed in around 30-35% of those who struggle with sleep. Insomnia is rated around 25%. Short sleep times in general are simply part of what makes it challenging for life on the road, not to mention meeting challenging and often inflexible hours-of-service obligations.

The aim of the dayzz team is to treat employees, so they’re looking to work with asset-based carriers in order to help them lower their risk, their health care system, and their turnover.

Currently the app is in beta testing. They’re in the validation process and evaluating the product’s ability with clinical trials being conducted both in Israel and the U.S.

Consumers are also beta testing the app within droid hardware, and they are getting data based upon user feedback. By the beginning of 2019 they anticipate enough downloads in the consumer market to have a thorough and complete first clinical trial.

Dr. Cohen-Zion says fatigue and sleepiness is something a lot of drivers have learned to live with, “and we are offering an alternative. We can offer a better way of life. We’ve been showing excellent results in productivity, a reduction in traffic accidents and work-related accidents, and improved health.”

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Drivers Note No Difference Since the ELD Mandate Enforcement Date

April 1, 2018 was the official date for the ELD mandate enforcement. The rule is that if drivers get caught violating this mandate, they will be put out of service for 10 hours, and then, they can continue their delivery with paper logs. However, they must be ELD compliant by the time they are dispatched on their next load.

The Overdrive staff at overdriveonline writes:

The first day of so-called “hard enforcement” of the ELD mandate came and went with little fanfare, based on a sampling of drivers’ online comments. In an interesting quirk of the calendar, the day coincided with April Fool’s Day and Easter Sunday, the day of the week itself one where truck-enforcement activity is characteristically light.

As noted by Overdrive in late March, the U.S. DOT and its enforcement partner the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance will begin putting truckers out of service for 10 hours if they’re required by regulations to have an ELD and aren’t running one. After the 10-hour period is up, drivers can continue to deliver their load on paper logs, though they must be compliant by the time they’re dispatched on their next load or be subject to another 10-hour out-of-service order.

 April 1 also marked the date by which ELD violations would begin counting against carriers’ scores in the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program.
Most owner-operators responding Monday to an evening request for comments posted to Overdrive‘s Facebook page noted nothing out of the ordinary in general terms from enforcement.“Haven’t noticed a thing” different, wrote Jeff Clark.

Glen Murphy concurred: “Haven’t seen anything out of the normal.”

To that point, noted Rick Underwood, “All of the California scales have been open for business today” on his routes through the state, known for its busy inspectors.

Several owner-ops and drivers took the opportunity to weigh in with either opposition to or support for the new reality that is the ELD mandate. A round-up follows below.

Renee Peek-Wiggins Crabtree: We haul livestock and are not required to use ELDs yet. We are working to get hours of service changed to accommodate everyone. That’s the real problem, more so than ELDs. 

Crabtree went on to espouse the view that ELDs nonetheless constituted a “big brother” invasion of privacy.

Ben Krull: I don’t drive a truck for a living but do deal with drivers every day. I hate the new law, because now all of the drivers are in a hurry and impatient.

Andy Brant: The same people complaining about [ELDs] are the same ones who are trying to bend the rules. The hours of service are the exact same now as they’ve been for a number of years now, and the government only sees the hours of service if you or your company get an audit [or inspection]. Every industry has a set of standards and rules for that specific industry, and you know them when you sign up. This isn’t changing those rules — it is enforcing people to be in compliance with the ones already set in place. This will actually make it easier for you to do your job correctly and by the law, if you take five minutes out of your day to learn it. Let’s face it, if you’re reading this you’re using the same type of technology as e-logs, so “the technology is too difficult” can’t be an excuse.

Missi Howard I got my class a license in 2015 so all I know is ELD. I miss the good old days when the cheaters could fill out their comic books any way they wanted and just keep driving. There was so much more parking then. ELDs have created a real parking crisis for me and I hate it.

And, Howard added, given she’s known nothing other than e-logs for hours recording, “if I ever have to do paper logs in an emergency I’m in trouble.”

 

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