This Technology Could Solve Distracted Driving for Fleets

With all the new technology on the market, there is now a greater need for drivers to use their smartphones. Additionally, cell phones have become the primary way to communicate with drivers on the road.

Chad Prevost of Freight Waves writes:

Sometimes one solution creates another problem. Then, a solution to the new problem becomes necessary. The problem is that now we have now ELD apps on smartphones, we’ve created a need for more user interaction with a smartphone in a truck. Granted, some ELD apps can’t allow a driver to change duty status when in motion but you can still pick up the phone and look at your hours.

“The other factor is that for many small fleets who don’t have a hard-wired in-cab mobile comm solution such as an Omnitracs or PeopleNet device, the phone is the primary means of communicating with a driver,” says Dean Croke, Chief Analytics Officer with FreightWaves.

That makes an upstart company like Live Undistracted effectively a large fleet solution.  Liability drives their safety agenda, as in being able to prove they had technology that stopped the driver from being distracted in the event of an accident. While owner-operators are not likely to adopt such a technology of their own accord, it is also often the case that the best drivers are owner-operators. They tend to have the most mileage and experience under their belts.

The company estimates that phone-related accidents cost commercial fleet operators over $2 billion per year and they’re developing a novel approach to the problem.  They came up with this data from external reports such as the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and reports from other fleets.

They looked at the issue from “top level down, and then a bottoms up approach,” according to CEO, Mike Falter. There are $8 billion in annual costs total, with about 50% related to the phone, and about half of those involve truck drivers.

While there are several solutions currently on the market, the company’s patent-pending approach is differentiated by its reliability, low power consumption, and what they call seamless integration. Fleet operators have the flexibility to define SafeMode, allowing for hands-free voice, navigation and music, or disabling the phone completely (except for emergency use). Once assigned to a vehicle(s) the App will run seamlessly in the background with no further action required by the driver.

While they are currently looking for their first round of seed money, and most of their competitors “have been out on the job for several years now,” Falter says they feel like their “technology is a refresh on the problem.”

The PhoneSafe System allows Fleet Managers to track and enforce their phone policies, prevent costly accidents, and ensure the safety of their drivers. “We do see it as a problem,” says Falter.

The company was founded in 2016, when they saw the problem for their own drivers. They weren’t satisfied with the solutions they were seeking. “We’ve heard similar concerns. Almost every company has some kind of policy in place. Our tool allows the managers and operators to track and trace the policy they already have in place,” says Falter.

For drivers, it’s about the relationship between them and the managers. “It’s in the driver’s best interest for their own personal safety,” says Falter. “It’s a way to help drivers do what they want to do, which is comply and to develop the behavior and good habit for their own personal safety. After a while they don’t even look for the distraction.

PhoneSafe integrates with the existing vehicle telematics system (or any third party OBDII dongle) and uses patent pending technology to detect when a vehicle is being operated, or in any gear other than Park.

The idea here is that the technology is universal, but also has something no one else has, which is to detect when a vehicle is in operation. “The way we detect it is proprietary. We have a unique approach that will be a differentiator.”

When the installed App detects the vehicle is being operated it places the phone in SafeMode which blanks the screen, or otherwise modifies the phone capabilities as required by company policy. There’s still the ability to make emergency calls, and it can’t get in the way of the ELDs, and you can still use hands free calling.

If technology caused the problem, the least it can do is provide a solution.

Read the article on Freight Waves by clicking here.

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Transport Pro Launches Freight Tracking Service for Brokers

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Oct. 11, 2018 — Transport Pro, a Web-based TMS provider, unveiled its latest feature today, Load Beacon—a freight tracking service. Transport Pro subscribers can now take advantage of the company’s in-house freight tracking service, seamlessly providing freight visibility in the TMS platform for freight managers and shippers.

While freight tracking is not a new concept, many brokers still struggle with the day-to-day tracking of loads due to drivers resisting downloads of app-based trackers on their phones, and fleet managers not wanting to give out their drivers’ cell phone numbers. The new tracking services offered by Transport Pro reduce the number of interruptive check calls to drivers so they can stay focused on the road.

Load Beacon offers two methods of tracking, one of which is an app-less service. This method works with all types of cell phones. From a modern smartphone to an old flip phone, Load Beacon can triangulate the location of a driver and provide the broker with load location updates. Using this location information, Transport Pro will automatically provide the ETA to pickup or delivery, which is visible directly from the software’s freight operations dashboard. To activate tracking, users simply enter the driver’s cell phone number in Transport Pro, and Load Beacon will request tracking from the driver via SMS.  Once the driver accepts tracking, the service will automatically pull the location updates from the phone while the driver is dispatched under that load.

The second level of service provided by Load Beacon is a direct integration with carrier ELDs. This solution was built for brokers who provide expedited, just-in-time freight services, or high value cargo that needs more frequent location updates, as well as accurate GPS information. Through a mutual data-sharing agreement, brokers can connect with carriers via supported ELDs and other location devices. Transport Pro’s dispatch system will display updated location information for dispatched loads every 15 minutes, significantly reducing the number of check calls required.

Not only does Transport Pro make this implementation painless for its customers by managing every aspect of the integration in house, it also gives brokers and shippers the visibility they demand.  Brokers can provide their customers with up-to-date freight visibility via the Transport Pro web-portal or via EDI connectivity direct to the shipper.

To learn more, or to schedule a demo, please contact a Transport Pro team member at 615-823-1937, or email info@transportpro.net.

About Transport Pro

Transport Pro is a leading transportation management software company providing Web-based technology to trucking companies, third party logistics and brokerages. Transport Pro’s innovative software streamlines daily business operations and offers a number of integrations to maximize workflow.

To read the press release published on DC Velocity, click here.

To read the article published in CCJ, click here.

 

Media Contacts:

Kelly Frederick

615-647-8933

kelly.frederick@transportpro.net

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Transportation Secretary Releases Updated DOT Guidelines for Autonomous Vehicles

Transportation Secretary, Elaine Chao, recently released updated DOT guidelines as they pertain to autonomous vehicles. These new guidelines focus on best practices for both state and local agencies.

Eleanor Lamb, Staff Reporter for Transport Topics, writes:

Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao on Oct. 4 unveiled AV 3.0, the agency’s policy update of autonomous vehicle technology guidelines.

Chao delivered remarks on the updated guidance, titled “Preparing for the Future of Transportation: Automated Vehicles 3.0,” at the Department of Transportation headquarters in Washington.

The update, which pertains to trucks, transit systems, cars and trains, highlights six central principles. They indicate that DOT will:

• Prioritize safety.

• Remain technology neutral.

• Modernize regulations.

• Encourage consistent regulations.

• Prepare proactively for automation.

• Protect the freedoms enjoyed by Americans.

“Integrating the autonomous vehicle technology into our transportation system has the potential to increase productivity, facilitate freight movement and create new types of jobs,” Chao said.

Autonomous technology can take a variety of forms, from lane-departure warning systems and automated brakes to truck platooning. Automated technologies have, however, raised public concern over security and privacy; Chao reported that nearly three-fourths of American drivers have expressed fear and anxiety about riding in a self-driving vehicle.

To appease these concerns, Chao said she has met with Silicon Valley innovators to inform the public about the benefits of automation. “While these technologies hold promise, they’ve not yet won public acceptance,” Chao said. “Without public acceptance, the full potential of these technologies will never be realized.”

One of autonomous technology’s most important implications is its potential to improve safety on roadways. Noting that 94% of accidents occur because of human error, Chao said that automated technology holds the potential to save lives.

AV 3.0 outlines best practices for state and local government agencies looking to test and operate autonomous technologies. To support state and local collaboration, the Federal Highway Administration will update the 2009 Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways, which provides standards for road managers to install and maintain traffic control devices on all public routes. In a media call after the event, FHWA acting Administrator Brandye Hendrickson said the updated manual will be “forward-looking.” Chao acknowledged that incorporating automated technologies into the workforce likely will require new training and new roles.

Some freight haulers have been apprehensive about autonomous vehicle technologies because they foster the perception that trucks soon may be driving themselves. While the trucking industry is contending with a lack of drivers — American Trucking Associations this year has reported the shortage at more than 50,000 — Richard Bishop, an automated vehicle industry analyst who serves as chairman of ATA’s Task Force on Automated Driving and Platooning, said it probably will be decades before trucks are driving themselves.

“I think it’ll happen slowly and there will be ways for existing retraining processes to have their effect,” Bishop told Transport Topics.

Chao recognized the fears associated with losing jobs to machines. At the event, she announced a joint initiative among the departments of Labor, Commerce and Health and Human Services to research the implications of automated vehicle technology on the workforce.

“I am extremely concerned about the impact of automated technology on the workforce,” Chao said, adding that the joint effort “will provide information that will help workers prepare for the future.”

DOT’s previous guidance on automated driving systems, AV 2.0, was published in September 2017. Chao has said that AV 2.0 was the most-viewed DOT policy document posted on the agency’s website, garnering more than 125,000 downloads.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration chief Ray Martinez said his agency speaks daily with industry representatives and public sector associations to better understand the impact of automated vehicles on the nation’s freight system.

“We recognize and value the unique perspective of drivers, of operators, of carriers and everyone in this industry,” Martinez said. “FMCSA plans to continue engaging the commercial motor vehicle community. This will continue to be a complex and fascinating undertaking.”

ATA President Chris Spear commended DOT’s willingness to hear from industry experts as the agency unveils — and continues to mold — this framework.

“This is a sound and substantive framework that rightly recognizes commercial vehicles are essential to any serious AV policy. In reaching out to a broad group of stakeholders, the Department should be commended for its thoughtful approach, which will enable an informed decision-making process around new and emerging technologies,” Spear said in a statement.

He added, “Thanks to Secretary Chao’s leadership, this guidance ensures that technological progress will not outpace the formation of key safety policy — and will enable America to maintain our role as world leaders both in innovation and in developing this framework. We look forward to working with the Secretary and FMCSA Administrator Martinez as this initiative rolls forward, and to having trucking’s voice as a vital contributor throughout this process.”

To read this article on Transport Topics, click here.

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